WHI-1254 | Seeing Jesus in the Old Testament, Part 1

Sunday, 19 Apr 2015

PROGRAM AUDIO & RESOURCES

This week on the White Horse Inn we begin a two-part series on how the Old Testament pointed to the Christ, Jesus of Nazareth. We are joined once more by Nancy Guthrie, who has written a five-volume book series addressing this topic, entitled Seeing Jesus in the Old Testament. Nancy has been a regular contributor to the White Horse Inn and is a teacher and author of several other books including Holding On to Hope: A Pathway through Suffering to the Heart of God, and Be Still, My Soul: Embracing God’s Purpose and Provision in Suffering.

For most Christians today, the Old Testament remains a closed book. If it is read at all, it is understood and interpreted like Aesop’s Fables. Many Christians were raised to believe that the Old Testament was little more than a collection of morality tales written to inspire us to have “faith like Abraham” or the “courage of Daniel.” And yet, Jesus taught his followers that the Old Testament actually pointed to himself (Jn. 5:39). What does this mean as we individually and corporately study God’s Word? How should we look at each Old Testament passage? Join us as we discuss this important topic of seeing Jesus in all of Scripture on the White Horse Inn.

 

Guest Quote

“What the Bible does is it answers the questions that you and I aren’t smart enough to know, to even ask those questions. So, studying the Bible, I think, honors [God] by allowing him to set the agenda. And then, what we discover is that what he says does meet our deepest needs, the ones we hadn’t even identified. But as we go to his Word, and we trust him to speak to us, he does!”

–Nancy Guthrie

 

Term to Learn

“The Scope of Scripture”

The Reformation insisted on the centrality of Christ to the entire Scripture. This centrality does not result merely from the fact that Christ is the goal and center of the messianic and covenantal history between the call of Abraham and the eschaton, but also from the ultimate focus of meaning of every text in Scripture on the work of God in Christ. Luther could insist that the genuine books of Scripture were known by their witness to Christ. Ursinus likewise declared that Christ is taught throughout the whole of Scripture as the foundation of doctrine and as the summation and focal point of the biblical message. On the one hand, this view could lead to a highly Christological reading of the Old Testament, particularly of the Psalms and the prophets. On the other, granting the relationship between Christ as the Word incarnate and Scripture as the accommodated form of the eternal word and wisdom of God, it served to reinforce the doctrine of Scriptural authority and to maintain a more dynamic view of the text in relation to doctrine.

(Adapted from The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation, s.v. “Scripture”)

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