White Horse Inn Blog

Know what you believe and why you believe it

“Why Can’t I Own Canadians?” Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth

On her radio show, Dr. Laura Schlesinger, an Orthodox Jew, said that homosexuality is an abomination according to Leviticus 18:22, and cannot be condoned under any circumstance. The following response is an open letter to Dr. Laura, which was posted on the Internet. It creates a great opportunity to talk about how we interpret the Bible (especially the Old Testament). We need to have good answers—better than Dr. Laura would have—to the frequent criticism that if we’re going to follow Leviticus on one thing (like the vileness of homosexuality), we have to take the rest (such as stoning homosexuals and rebellious children—not to mention, the ban on pork, etc., and holy war in defense of a holy nation).

Dear Dr. Laura:

Thank you for doing so much to educate people regarding God’s Law. I have learned a great deal from your show, and try to share that knowledge with as many people as I can. When someone tries to defend the homosexual lifestyle, for example, I simply remind them that Leviticus 18:22 clearly states it to be an abomination …. End of debate.

I do need some advice from you, however, regarding some other elements of God’s Laws and how to follow them.

  • 1. Leviticus 25:44 states that I may possess slaves, both male and female, provided they are purchased from neighboring nations. A friend of mine claims that this applies to Mexicans, but not Canadians. Can you clarify? Why can’t I own Canadians?
  • 2. I would like to sell my daughter into slavery, as sanctioned in Exodus 21:7. In this day and age, what do you think would be a fair price for her?
  • 3. I know that I am allowed no contact with a woman while she is in her period of Menstrual uncleanliness – Lev15: 19-24. The problem is how do I tell? I have tried asking, but most women take offense.
  • 4. When I burn a bull on the altar as a sacrifice, I know it creates a pleasing odor for the Lord – Lev.1:9. The problem is my neighbors. They claim the odor is not pleasing to them. Should I smite them?
  • 5. I have a neighbor who insists on working on the Sabbath. Exodus 35:2 clearly states he should be put to death. Am I morally obligated to kill him myself, or should I ask the police to do it?
  • 6. A friend of mine feels that even though eating shellfish is an abomination, Lev. 11:10, it is a lesser abomination than homosexuality. I don’t agree. Can you settle this? Are there ‘degrees’ of abomination?
  • 7. Lev. 21:20 states that I may not approach the altar of God if I have a defect in my sight. I have to admit that I wear reading glasses. Does my vision have to be 20/20, or is there some wiggle-room here?
  • 8. Most of my male friends get their hair trimmed, including the hair around their temples, even though this is expressly forbidden by Lev. 19:27. How should they die?
  • 9. I know from Lev. 11:6-8 that touching the skin of a dead pig makes me unclean, but may I still play football if I wear gloves?
  • 10. My uncle has a farm. He violates Lev.19:19 by planting two different crops in the same field, as does his wife by wearing garments made of two different kinds of thread (cotton/polyester blend). He also tends to curse and blaspheme a lot. Is it really necessary that we go to all the trouble of getting the whole town together to stone them? Lev.24:10-16. Couldn’t we just burn them to death at a private family affair, like we do with people who sleep with their in-laws? (Lev. 20:14)

I know you have studied these things extensively and thus enjoy considerable expertise in such matters, so I’m confident you can help. Thank you again for reminding us that God’s word is eternal and unchanging.

Your adoring fan
(It would be a damn shame if we couldn’t own a Canadian)

Although the responses aren’t usually this clever, the “Do you really want to go to Leviticus?” argument packs a punch in contemporary debates. Often, the critic assumes that every biblical command is a timeless and universal law. They really can’t bear the blame by themselves for this misunderstanding, since it’s common to a lot of Christian preaching through the ages. Medieval popes invoked these “holy war” passages for the crusades and appealed to Leviticus for prohibiting the charging of interest on loans to Christians.

In fact, John Calvin took aim at medieval canon law on just these very points, explaining that while the moral law is indeed universally binding for all time and places, the civil and ceremonial laws attached to it in the Old Testament covenant code were given uniquely to the only nation that has ever been chosen and separated as holy to the Lord. Anticipated by John the Baptist’s fiery announcement of a judgment in God’s house, Jesus pronounced his covenant curses on the religious leaders and in word and deed replaced the Temple. The only holy land after Jesus’ resurrection is his body, those who are united to him through faith, “from every tribe, kindred, tongue, people, and nation” (Rev 5:9). Already in Hebrews 8:13, the old covenant could be called “obsolete.”

The commands in the old covenant law (viz., Leviticus and Deuteronomy) are specific to that remarkable geo-political theocracy that foreshadowed the universal kingdom of Christ. The deliverance of Israel in the exodus anticipates a far greater exodus through the waters of death and hell in Christ. The holy wars pale in comparison with the judgment of the nations that Christ will execute at the end of the age. Even if Israel had been faithful to this covenant, Canaan would have only been a type or small-scale model of the extensiveness and intensiveness of God’s reign at the end of the age. Moses could not give God’s people rest in the land of everlasting Sabbath. As the prophets proclaim, this would only come when one greater than Moses would rescue his people and lead them victoriously into the perfect peace, love, and joy that he would win for his co-heirs.

Sure, we learn from Leviticus 18:22 that God considers homosexuality an abomination. Yet our critics (at least the clever ones) will point out that the same code threatens excommunication for eating any meat with blood in it (Lev 17:10) and eating animals that chew the cud or part the hoof (like pigs) is strictly forbidden as “unclean” (Lev 11). The responder above points to many other examples.

Few of these commands can be explained in terms of general wisdom for hygiene, sanitation, and gastronomic health. They focus attention on God’s act of separating Israel (“clean”) from the unclean nations. Each set of prohibitions is a facet in the diamond of an old covenant system that sparkled with anticipation of the coming Messiah. It takes a good knowledge of the covenantal context and import of these commands for Israel to recognize their unique significance in this history of redemption. It also requires that we interpret the Old Testament in light of the New Testament, allowing the fulfillment to guide our understanding of the typological promise.

A good place to start in digging deeper is M. G. Kline’s Kingdom Prologue, especially where he talks about “Intrusion Ethics”: that is, the suspension of ordinary providence in favor of miracle, ordinary wisdom in favor of God’s direct word through the prophets, just war among common nations in favor of holy war on behalf of God’s holy land and nation. Homosexuality is still a violation of God’s moral law for all times and places, but the sanction for it under the old covenant (death by stoning) was theocracy-specific.

Living in an era that foreshadowed the last judgment, the Psalmist properly offered imprecatory prayers calling for God’s judgment on the ungodly. Nevertheless, in Jesus’ ministry this identification of heaven with a geo-political nation was declared no longer in effect. In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus quotes some of these passages in Leviticus and Deuteronomy: “You have heard it said, ‘…..’ But I say,….” These old covenant commands were not wrong; they had their place in the theocratic government that God exercised directly over his people. However, Jesus rebukes James and John when they seek to call fire down on the Samaritan village that rejected the gospel. I offer a summary of this argument in The Christian Faith (chapter 29).

In the moral law that runs not only through the whole Bible but throughout the codes of so many civilizations across the ages, God reveals his righteous character. In the specific legislation that God attaches to this moral law for Israel alone, however, God’s moral will is in service to his saving will in Jesus Christ. These Israel-specific laws are not intended to regulate the constitutions of common nations, but ultimately to play their part in a theocratic system that leads us ultimately to Christ and his everlasting kingdom. So you can’t invoke the old covenant passages for common nations in this era in which Christ’s kingdom is not identified with any geo-political nation. It’s an era of forgiveness, a stay of execution before the dreadful day of judgment. In this in-between time, the kingdom of Christ (regardless of what the secular kingdoms of this age determine) announces God’s righteous judgment and gracious salvation. It calls all people everywhere—gay, straight, gossips, and the pious grandmother who trusts in her own righteousness—to repent and embrace God’s only Son.

Christianity.com Video 12 – Misconceptions about Hell

Systematic theology is very important because it helps give us a balanced approach when thinking about tough doctrines. Sure we don’t like talking about hell, but it is a necessary subject because of who God is. Mike Horton causes us to think about these things in the next Christianity.com video interview.

Tomorrow we will see a video where Mike discusses more about the importance of Christians studying theology.

WHI-1068 | The New Covenant

Over five hundred years before the time of Christ, Jeremiah prophesied that the days would come when God would “make a new covenant with the house of Israel” (Jer. 31:31). So how is this new covenant fulfilled in Jesus’ life and sacrificial death? How is it different from the old covenant received by Moses on Mount Sinai? Is it true that before Christ the Old Testament saints were really saved by works? On this edition of the program, the hosts will discuss these questions as they walk through Hebrews 8-10. White Horse Inn: Know what you believe and why you believe it.

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Christianity.com Video 11 – Religious or Spiritual vs. Gospel-Focused

The Friday edition of the Christianity.com video interview of Mike Horton asks him to respond to Christians who claim to be “spiritual” but not “religious.” Mike responds by saying that Christians shouldn’t be either, but to be gospel-focused looking to the incarnate Christ.

Christianity.com Video 10 – What Must We Believe to be Saved?

A proper understanding of faith helps resolve the question of “how much do I need to believe in order to be saved?” Dr. Horton discusses this in the next Christianity.com video.

Christianity.com Video 9 – The One True God is in Fact True!

As we continue our trek through Mike’s Christianity.com videos we come to Mike discussing why we can be certain that God exists and that he is the one true God.

Christianity.com Video 8 – Speaking with Unbelievers, even Muslims, about the Gospel

Getting the gospel out is what the church is called to do in The Great Commission. But how do individual Christians share the gospel with unbelievers be they Muslims or even “Christians” who don’t actually believe? Dr. Horton was asked to address this question in our next Christianity.com video.

In this video Mike mentions a list of points where Christians and our hostile critics agree. That list can be found here.

Mike Horton Invites You to Our Conference at Sea

We’re so excited to host our very first Conversation for a Modern Reformation! Already people from five countries and twenty-two states have registered to join Mike, Rod, Ken, and Kim at our Conference at Sea. The cruise will be a working vacation, an opportunity for you to sit down with other Reformation-minded people from around the world and spend some dedicated time thinking about the future of the church.

Here’s the schedule of events:

January 28th: White Horse Inn Presents: For and Against Calvinism–A Conversation Between Mike Horton and Roger Olson. Mike Horton (a convinced Calvinist) and Roger Olson (a convinced Arminian) will sit down to discuss their differences in this public conversation. Hear them talk about their new books (For Calvinism and Against Calvinism, published by Zondervan); observe their conversation about the issues at stake; and pose your own questions to these two seasoned theologians. This event will require registration, is open to the public, and will be at the hotel our cruise participants will be staying at in Miami. We’ll have more details (exact place and time) in the next few weeks.

January 29th: morning worship at Glendale Missionary Baptist Church and a special live taping of the White Horse Inn. Mike Horton will be preaching at Ken’s church in Miami. Then, all the hosts will participate in a special live taping of the White Horse Inn on Sunday night back at the hotel. This event is free and open to the public. Pull up a stool and join us at the Inn!

January 30th thru February 4th: the conversation begins!  We’ll start things off with a welcome reception and introduction the night of the 30th. We’ll get right to work the next day crafting 95 new theses for a modern Reformation. We’ll intersperse our group work with White Horse Inn tapings and special lectures from each host. In the coming weeks, we’ll post audio excerpts of each of the hosts describing their presentation. There will also be plenty of time to grab a meal or a pint with one of the hosts and the new friends that will join you on board.

February 4th thru…: it’s your turn! After we return to Miami, the real work of reformation begins as we return to our homes, our churches, our friends and family. How will we put the insights that we’ve wrestled with to work in our own circles of influence?

We’re eager to keep up with you, both before and after the cruise: how are you preparing for the important conversations we’ll be having? How are you implementing what you’ve learned? Join our Conversations for a Modern Reformation facebook page and share your insights with folks who will be on the cruise or will be participating in other events all leading up to the 500th anniversary of Luther’s nailing of the 95 Theses on the door of the Castle Church.

Be sure to listen to Mike Horton’s recent interview about the cruise that was broadcast on the White Horse Inn on September 4th. You’ll hear what motivated us to start this conversation, how the different elements of discussion, teaching, and conversation will be woven together, and why we think it’s important to spend time together wrestling through these important issues.

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We hope to see you in Miami at all of the different conversations we’ll be hosting. You can register for the cruise here. Other events will be updated in the coming weeks.

Get Liberated!

One of our favorite Floridians and Presbyterians (not necessarily in that order) is Tullian Tchividjian, the pastor of Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church. You’ve heard him on the White Horse Inn and he’s recently featured an interview with Mike on Law and Gospel at his blog. We’re also excited to announce that we are partnering with him for the Liberate Conference in February 2012.

Here’s how Tullian describes it:

I wholeheartedly believe that the gospel of grace is way more drastic, way more offensive, way more liberating, way more shocking, and way more counterintuitive than any of us realize. There is nothing more radically unbalanced and drastically unsafe than grace. It has no “but”: it’s unconditional, uncontrollable, unpredictable, and undomesticated. It unsettles everything. There is a dangerous depth to the gospel that needs to be rediscovered and embraced…and that’s what the LIBERATE Conference is all about.

Beginning February 23-25, 2012 at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida (and every year thereafter) the LIBERATE Conference will explore the depths and riches of God’s scandalous grace in the gospel. We want it to become a catalytic platform for serious thinking about “a more radical gospel.”

So, to help kick off our first annual LIBERATE Conference, I’ve asked some of my friends to join me–a group of unafraid gospel-addicts, steel-spined soldiers of grace: Michael Horton, Paul Tripp, Elyse Fitzpatrick, Scotty Smith, Darrin Patrick, David Zahl, Rod Rosenbladt, and Doug Sauder. Scott Anderson (Executive Director of Desiring God) will be emceeing and Mark Miller (Director of Music at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church) will be leading us in music.

In addition to their conference sessions, Mike and the other cohosts of the White Horse Inn will tape a live recording from the conference. This is a great opportunity for you to see the conversation that you normally just get to listen to.

Plan on joining us in February at Coral Ridge. You can register here.

Christianity.com Video 7 – Christians and the Great Commission

Christianity.com recently asked Dr. Horton in their video series what is The Great Commission? In a video fitting for this year’s White Horse Inn theme Mike explains not only the imperative “Go,” but also the announcement that precedes and the promise that ends that commission.

In this video Mike mentions a list of points where Christians and our hostile critics agree. That list can be found here.

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