Reformational Christianity has been characterized as a “Religion of the Book.” Not only does this apply to the highest view of Scripture, but it also means that we publish our thoughts and ideas for the masses to read. The Reformation that swept through Europe in the 16th century was, in large part, fueled by the printing press and the ability for people to be “taught by” the first generation of Reformers through their writings.

In the centuries that followed Luther and Calvin, their successors continued to write volumes concerning Scripture and the fundamental truths of the Reformation. However, many of those works were written into Latin and other languages not known to our current English-speaking theological culture. We have much to learn from our forefathers in the faith, if only we could read them!

Recently there has been a group of scholars and pastors who have undertaken the task of translating these previously hidden works of Classic Reformed theologians into English-most for the first time. These works are being published in the series “Classic Reformed Theology” published by Reformation Heritage Books. Currently there are two volumes that have been released, but many others are in varying stages of production.

These works promise to be great value not only to scholars and pastors, but also to lay-people who want to have a deeper understanding of the Reformed tradition as it was formulated and articulated by the first generations of Reformers.

Here are the two volumes that have been released thus far:

  • Caspar Olevianus, An Exposition of the Apostles’ Creed (Purchase here)
  • William Ames, A Sketch of the Christian’s Catechism (Purchase here)

One of the editors of the series, R. Scott Clark (a WHI guest and contributor to MR), was recently interviewed concerning the series on the Office Hours podcast of Westminster Seminary California. Information concerning that audio can be found here.