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This week on the White Horse Inn we begin part four of our series on the Book of Hebrews, focusing on chapters four through seven. We are joined once more by Dennis Johnson and Zach Keele. Dennis Johnson is Professor of Practical Theology at Westminster Seminary California, and Zach Keele is the pastor of Escondido Orthodox Presbyterian Church.

Join us this week as we discuss the nature of Christ’s priestly office. If the Old Testament has passed away, why do we need high priest? What does it mean for Christ to be the great high priest over the house of God? How is Christ’s work far greater than that of the Levitical priesthood? What benefit is there to understanding this final priesthood? How is Christ’s work for the church connected to the new covenant? Join us as we continue to look at the superiority of Christ’s priestly work from the Book of Hebrews on the White Horse Inn.

 
GUEST QUOTE
“Ultimately in the Old Testament, it becomes clear that you need two things to bring you into the fullness of God’s covenant rest: kingship and priesthood. One takes you forward into heaven and the other brings you in closer to God. One frees you from your enemies and the other makes you holy and puts wrath away.”
– Zach Keele
 
PROGRAM AUDIO AND RESOURCES
 
TERM TO LEARN
"Humanity of the God-Man"
Q. 37 How did Christ, being the Son of God, become man? A. Christ the Son of God became man, by taking to himself a true body, and a reasonable soul, being conceived by the power of the Holy Ghost in the womb of the Virgin Mary, of her substance, and born of her, yet without sin.
Q. 38 Why was it requisite that the mediator should be God? A. It was requisite that the mediator should be God, that he might sustain and keep the human nature from sinking under the infinite wrath of God, and the power of death; give worth and efficacy to his sufferings, obedience, and intercession; and to satisfy God's justice, procure his favor, purchase a peculiar people, give his Spirit to them, conquer all their enemies, and bring them to everlasting salvation.
Q. 39 Why was it requisite that the mediator should be man? A. It was requisite that the mediator should be man, that he might advance our nature, perform obedience to the law, suffer and make intercession for us in our nature, have a fellow-feeling of our infirmities; that we might receive the adoption of sons, and have comfort and access with boldness unto the throne of grace.
Q. 40 Why was it requisite that the mediator should be God and man in one person? A. It was requisite that the mediator, who was to reconcile God and man, should himself be both God and man, and this in one person, that the proper works of each nature might be accepted of God for us, and relied on by us, as the works of the whole person.
(The Westminster Larger Catechism)
 
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This week on the White Horse Inn we are continuing our study of the Book of Hebrews, focusing on chapters three and four. We are joined once more by Dennis Johnson and Zach Keele. Dennis Johnson is Professor of Practical Theology at Westminster Seminary California, and Zach Keele is the pastor of Escondido Orthodox Presbyterian Church.

Join us this week as we discuss the nature of new covenant religion and the status of those in Christ. Why does the author of Hebrews react so strongly to the idea of going back to old covenant practices? Why is the Mosaic covenant superseded now that Christ has come? On what basis should we reject old covenant worship as obsolete? While Moses was, in fact, the spokesperson for God, God himself has become the mediator of a new and better covenant that takes away the sin of the people. Join us as we continue to look at the superiority of Christ from the Book of Hebrews on the White Horse Inn.

 
GUEST QUOTE
“What strikes me by this adjective, ‘holy,’ is that under the Old Testament you weren’t always necessarily holy. There was a kind of covenantal holiness which referred to membership, but in terms of Leviticus and Numbers only the priests were holy. The people were not. And he just has told us that Jesus is our high priest who’s the one who sanctifies and we are the ones being sanctified in chapter two and now [Christ] has made this propitiation. To say ‘holy brothers’ is granting them a new covenant status that you could not attain in the Old Testament, unless you were a priest. And so, he really honors them with this and really builds upon this idea that Christ is this high priest who’s made this propitiation, and now…. ‘holy brothers’.”
– Zach Keele
 
PROGRAM AUDIO AND RESOURCES
 
TERM TO LEARN
"Israel in the Mosaic Period"
After the exodus the people of Israel were not only organized into a nation, but were also constituted the Church of God. They were enriched with institutions in which not only family devotion or tribal faith but the religion of the nation could find expression. The Church did not yet obtain an independent organization, but had its institutional existence in the national life of Israel. The particular form which it assumed was that of a Church-State. We cannot say that the two coalesced altogether. There were separate civil and religious functionaries and institutions within the bounds of the nation. But at the same time the whole nation constituted the Church; and the Church was limited to the one nation of Israel, though foreigners could enter it by being incorporated into the nation. In this period there was a marked and greater clearness in the apprehension of the truth. The worship of God was regulated down to the minutest details, was largely ritual and ceremonial, and was centered in one central sanctuary.
(Adapted from Louis Berkhof, Systematic Theology)
 
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This week on the White Horse Inn we are continuing our study through the Book of Hebrews, looking at the superiority of Christ’s sacrifice. We are joined once more by Dennis Johnson and Zach Keele. Dennis Johnson is Professor of Practical Theology at Westminster Seminary California, as well as a minister at New Life Presbyterian Church in Escondido, CA. He is the author of several books including Him We Proclaim: Preaching Christ from All of Scripture, Triumph of the Lamb: A Commentary on Revelation, and The Message of Acts in the History of Redemption. Zach Keele is a frequent contributor to Modern Reformation and the pastor of Escondido Orthodox Presbyterian Church. He is the co-author of Sacred Bond: Covenant Theology Explored.

Join us this week as we discuss the nature of Christ’s priestly sacrifice. Why do we need a human mediator? How is Jesus’ priestly work superior to the old covenant? On what basis should we reject old covenant worship as obsolete? What hope can we draw from this Epistle? Let’s listen in as we delve into the Book of Hebrews on the White Horse Inn.

 
GUEST QUOTE
“In this citation and use of Psalm 8, the writer and preacher of Hebrews so much assumes what we know from Paul – the two Adams. If you look at Psalm 8, it is clear it is ‘of David’ and if you look at verse 2 it talks about ‘foes’ and the Lord having victory over his foes. And then, it goes into this recalling of Genesis 1, ‘You created man, and everything is under him.’
I think that some of the language here, particularly ‘Crowned him with glory and honor’ is royal terminology that in other places gets used of David’s kingship. I think you can see in the Psalm hints that David is writing, hoping his kingship will fulfill what Adam failed to do, that the Lord will use him in this way. You see a hair of prophecy in David that then, Hebrews knows who it’s ultimately speaking of, Christ and also us in Christ! This can be seen in the flow of Psalm 7 and Psalm 8. David has this hope that this kingship of the first [Adam] will somehow be fulfilled in him, and obviously Hebrews picks this up and applies it to Christ.”
– Zach Keele
 
PROGRAM AUDIO AND RESOURCES
 
TERM TO LEARN
"Christ’s Threefold Office"
Christ’s person and work are often spoken of as fulfilling three distinct offices: prophet, priest, and king, in both his humiliation and exaltation. Prophets are teachers, and covenant lawyers, carrying out the heavenly policy of which they speak. In the Mount of Transfiguration, Jesus is attended by Moses and Elijah, confirming his work as a prophet. The command to “listen to him” directly connects Jesus to God’s promise in Deut. 18:15 to raise up a prophet like Moses. And yet, Jesus is also greater than Moses, acting as a mediator who can offer the forgiveness of sins in his person. Christ continues to be a prophet over his church by his Word and Spirit, inaugurating the new kingdom through his very words and actions, as the message about him and from him goes to the four corners of the earth.
Christ is also the great high priest whose sacrifice embodied the entire old covenant sacrificial system, and yet procured the redemption only foreshadowed by these rituals. Christ was the Melchizedek over the house of God, greater than the Levitical priesthood, purchasing the salvation for the elect by an indestructible sacrifice, by which he continually make intercession for his people, forever purifying our consciences. Christ is also the king. He is not only the Son of God according to eternal generation, but the Son of David’s line who fulfilled all the first Adam failed, providing true righteousness and holiness and triumphing over sin, death, and hell by his very death. His death purchased the right for the Son of Man to be raised in power to the right hand of the majesty on high, where he governs and rules in the midst of his enemies and brings all his people to glory. The offices of prophet, priest, and king find their completion in him alone. Through the fulfillment of these offices as the God-man, Christ offered the atonement needed to propitiate the wrath of God, reconcile men to himself, and purchase the heavenly kingdom. This was done, not from need or necessity, but according to the great love with which he has loved his people.
(Adapted from Michael Horton, The Christian Faith: A Systematic Theology for Pilgrims on the Way, pp. 483-547)
 
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Do you love Modern Reformation? Do you like it? Are you ambivalent? Do you read it?

Whether you think we’re doing an A-plus job or the editorial staff should be ignominiously sacked, we want to hear from you! Go to www.whitehorseinn.org/survey and tell us what you think about everything from the content to the type size. 

There’s more! One lucky participant will receive a Kindle Fire—just give us your name, e-mail address, and phone number at the end of the survey, and you’ll be entered to win.

The best part of working at MR is hearing about how our readers have been encouraged and edified by our content. Help us continue that ongoing effort by telling us what works and what doesn’t. We can’t do it without you!  

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This week on the White Horse Inn, Dennis E. Johnson and Zach Keele join us as we begin a trip through the Book of Hebrews. Dennis Johnson is Professor of Practical Theology at Westminster Seminary California, as well as a minister at New Life Presbyterian Church in Escondido, CA. He is the author of several books including Him We Proclaim: Preaching Christ from All of Scripture, Triumph of the Lamb: A Commentary on Revelation, and The Message of Acts in the History of Redemption. Zach Keele is a frequent contributor to Modern Reformation and the pastor of Escondido Orthodox Presbyterian Church. He is the co-author of Sacred Bond: Covenant Theology Explored. These pastors will help us as we survey the rich vistas of the Book of Hebrews. Who was it written to? Why is this New Testament epistle applicable to the modern church? What can we learn from these Christians who suffered in the ancient world?

Join us this week on the White Horse Inn as we look at the sufficiency of Christ from the Book of Hebrews.

 
HOST QUOTE
“In the very words where [the author of Hebrews] starts contrasting time frame, ‘times past’ versus ‘these last days,’ he is showing that flow of redemptive history is also reflected now in the flow of revelation. It is really emphasizing the fact that Christ is the place where now God has spoken most fully, and as he will say in the second chapter, we have received that now as second generation Christians through those who heard him… That shows the finality of new covenant revelation… old covenant revelation given over the span of a millennium, but now New Testament in a single generation… The completeness of New Testament revelation is key.”
– Dennis Johnson
 
PROGRAM AUDIO AND RESOURCES
 
TERM TO LEARN
"Redemptive-Historical Typology"
Old Testament events, offices, and institutions (hereafter OTEOI) are invested by God with spiritual significance as integral steps in his history-long project to reverse sin and its effects... these OTEOI point beyond themselves, symbolizing the comprehensive, eschatological salvation that is God's purpose for history and that has been inaugurated by Christ in his first coming and that will be consummated by Christ in his second coming. To understand how any OTEOI preaches Christ and finds its fulfillment in him, we first must grasp its symbolic depth in its own place in redemptive history. Then we need to consider how the OTEOI's original symbolic depth (the aspect of redemption to which it pointed in shadow-form) finds final and complete fulfillment in Christ. Finally, we must identify and articulate how its message applies to ourselves and our listeners. The apostles' proclamation of Christ as the fulfillment of all God's promises provides abundant direction for the grateful outworking of this good news in personal discipline, family life, church life, and public life in the marketplace-and, if necessary, in a prison, like Paul.
(Adapted from Dennis E. Johnson, Him We Proclaim: Preaching Christ from All the Scriptures, pp.234-237) )
 
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This week on the White Horse Inn,  we’re continuing our series on the Holy Trinity. Now, many of us still remember the Holy Ghost from the old King James Version. For most modern people a “ghost” is associated more with All Hallows Eve, Halloween, rather than Pentecost Sunday. Especially, in our age, the Holy Spirit, when he is taken seriously at all, is the spooky member of the Trinity. If you are in to that thing, the paranormal, the sensational, then the Holy Spirit is for you. Now, I want to challenge this association of the Spirit merely with the spectacular. First, it distinguishes his work too sharply from the Father and the Son. After all, the Father is the origin of every work [of the Trinity] and the Spirit brings that work to completion. [The Father’s] work is no less supernatural. The Son purchased, by his active and passive obedience, every scrap of precious material that the Holy Spirit uses to build Christ’s kingdom.

Second, reducing the Spirit’s work to the exceptions distracts us from the vast range of his activity in our world and in our daily lives. On both sides of the Pentecostal divide, we too easily treat the Holy Spirit as a placeholder for the extra things in Christianity. Sure, we have the Father and the Son but we also need the Holy Spirit. The Word is vital but we can’t forget the Spirit. Doctrine is important but there is also experience.

Consequently, the Spirit becomes type-casted into predictable roles. He makes cameo appearances, especially in the Book of Acts. We think of him when we are talking about the application of redemption, especially regeneration and sanctification, and when we’re arguing about his more controversial gifts, like tongues and healing. Who is the Holy Spirit? Does he really matter today?

Join us this week on the White Horse Inn as we look at the person and work of the Holy Spirit and why we need to recover a vital vision of his activity in the word and in us.

 
HOST QUOTE

“We now have a couple generations where the liturgy has been gutted of the creed, of the formal liturgies, the prayers, the hymns, that inculcated the faith. There is this great line from Basil, a fourth century theologian, who said that the Trinity is to be inculcated, not only in our instruction, but he said in the forms of the service we are handing down. He revised the liturgy to reflect the conclusions of Nicaea and Constantinople.

When we get rid of those, what we find is really terrible evacuations of Trinitarian worship. You go into a catechism class and say we are talking about the Trinity today, and they role their eyes. Why? Because there is no relevance of the Trinity in their lives. You can’t start with the questions on the Trinity in the catechism. They’ve got to get it from their mother’s milk, growing up in the church, praying to the Father, in the Son, by the Spirit.”

– Michael Horton
 
PROGRAM AUDIO AND RESOURCES
 
TERM TO LEARN
"The Holy Spirit"
We believe and confess also that the Holy Spirit from eternity proceeds from the Father and the Son; and therefore neither is made, created, nor begotten, but only proceeds from both; who in order is the third person of the Holy Trinity; of one and the same essence, majesty, and glory with the Father and the Son; and therefore is the true and eternal God, as the Holy Scriptures teach us.
(The Belgic Confession, Article 11))
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Merry Christmas from our family to yours!

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Michael Horton recently sat down and answered a few questions about Scripture: it's reliability, interpretation, and application to our lives. We’ll be posting videos of his explanations through the end of the year. For more information on our Recovering Scripture campaign and for additional resources to help you “know and share what you believe and why you believe it,” please visit the homepage of our year end appeal.

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Posted by on in 2014 Show Archive

This week on the White Horse Inn, our hosts are joined by Justin Holcomb. Justin is an Episcopal minister and adjunct professor of theology at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, Florida. He has written and edited a number of books, including On the Grace of God and Rid of My Disgrace. His most recent works include Know the Creeds and Councils and Know the Heretics (both Zondervan, 2014) which will be the topic of today’s discussion.

Why should we care about the early church’s creeds? Why should Christians use catechisms today? What possible relevance do they have to our worship and life? What is heresy and how can we differentiate it from the truth?

Join us this week on the White Horse Inn as we look at the rich heritage of proclaiming Christ in the tradition of the church fathers and councils.

        

 
HOST QUOTE
“There are people, who out of devotion and sincerity thought, ‘Well, let’s get past all of this ritual stuff and get to the Bible and get to Jesus.’ Well, that’s what the creeds actually do. That’s what the creeds were meant to do. They’re some of the best summaries of Scripture – the highpoints of Scripture, the highpoints of revelation. And it’s the creeds which are about the revelation of God in Christ and in Scripture. Most of the creeds, because they were responding to heresies which were about Jesus, are all about Jesus. They’re focused on who he is and what he’s done – the person and work of Christ – and many of the creeds were relying on Scripture. A lot of the things that are there are summaries of Scripture or quotes. I’m an Anglican… the Book of Common Prayer, half of that thing is just quotations from Scripture.”
– Justin Holcomb
 
PROGRAM AUDIO AND RESOURCES
 
TERM TO LEARN
"Catechism"
Catechism (from the Greek word catechesis) is simply instruction in the basic doctrines of the Christian faith. Instead of replacing or supplanting the role of the Bible in Christian education, catechism ideally serves as the basis for it. For the practice of catechism, as properly understood, is the Christian equivalent of looking at the box top of a jigsaw puzzle before one starts to put all of those hundreds of little pieces together. It is very important to look at the big picture and have it clearly in mind, so that we do not bog down in details, or get endlessly sidetracked by some unimportant or irrelevant issue. The theological categories given to us through catechism help us to make sense out of the myriad of details found in the Scriptures themselves. Catechism serves as a guide to better understanding Scripture. That being noted however, we need to remind ourselves that Protestants have always argued that creeds, confessions and catechisms are authoritative only in so far as they faithfully reflect the teaching of Holy Scripture. This means that the use of catechisms, which correctly summarize biblical teaching, does not negate or remove the role of Holy Scripture. Instead, these same creeds, confessions and catechisms, as summary statements of what the Holy Scriptures themselves teach about a particular doctrine, should serve as a kind of springboard to more effective Bible study.
(Kim Riddlebarger, “Fathers, Instruct Your Children: Recovering the Practice of Catechism in the Home,” Modern Reformation, March/April 1995)
 
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This week, on the White Horse Inn, our hosts are continuing this series on the Trinity. They are joined again by Fred Sanders. Fred Sanders is the associate professor of theology at Biola University's Torrey Honors Institute. He has contributed to several books, including recent works on the Trinity: The Deep Things of God: How the Trinity Changes Everything, and Advancing Trinitarian Theology: Explorations in Constructive Dogmatics with Oliver Crisp. In this interview the panel discusses why belief in the Trinity is a foundational and fundamental belief of Christianity. What does it mean to believe in one God? Does this claims cohere with the Old Testament religion? How did the early Christians come to worship Jesus as God? 

Join us this week on the White Horse Inn as we look at what it means for Christians to worship the Triune God as he has revealed himself in the biblical drama of redemption.

 
HOST QUOTE
“[Jesus] makes himself equal with God and at the same time submits himself to his Father’s will… Again, what does that press you to do? When you receive these reports from eyewitnesses, that this rabbi made himself equal with God, forgave sins directly in his person, which any Jew knew meant that he was claiming to be Yahweh, that he is the one who leads you to the Father, and yet he talks about the Father as distinct from himself, and ‘I was with the Father before all ages’, so all that stuff that John was telling us at the beginning of the Gospels, now spread throughout, what do you do with that? ‘I am God’ and yet ‘I came from my Father.’ ‘Oh, and by the way, I am going back and the Father and I are going to send the Holy Spirit.’ Where do you go other than one God, one in essence, three persons?”
– Michael Horton
 
PROGRAM AUDIO AND RESOURCES
 
TERM TO LEARN
"Doctrine"
Historical Protestantism maintains that the doctrinal truths embodied in dogmas are either contained explicitly in Scripture, or are deduced from it by "good and necessary consequence." Dogmas are not mere repetitions of Scripture statements, but careful, albeit human and therefore fallible, formulations of doctrines contained in the Word of God.
The Christian consciousness not only appropriates the truth, but also feels an irrepressible urge to reproduce it and to see it in its grand unity. While the intellect gives guidance and direction to this reflection, it is not purely an intellectual activity, but one that is moral and emotional as well. The understanding, the will, the affections, in short, the whole person, is brought into play. All the faculties of his soul and all the movements of his inner life contribute to the final result. Broader still, it is not merely the individual Christian, but rather the Church of God as a whole, under the guidance of the Holy Spirit, that is the subject of this reflective activity.
(Adapted from Louis Berkhof, Systematic Theology)
 
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Michael Horton recently sat down and answered a few questions about Scripture: it's reliability, interpretation, and application to our lives. We’ll be posting videos of his explanations through the end of the year. For more information on our Recovering Scripture campaign and for additional resources to help you “know and share what you believe and why you believe it,” please visit the homepage of our year end appeal.

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The Trinity is a complex and mysterious doctrine that is often difficult to understand. However, it's also a crucial doctrine that lies at the heart of the Christian faith. Michael Horton, along with the hosts, attempt to bring clarity to this issue as they explore the doctrine of the Trinity with the help of Fred Sanders, author of The Deep Things of God: How the Trinity Changes Everything.

PROGRAM AUDIO


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Do the various religions of the world actually have much in common? How can we all worship the same God if some traditions believe in a plurality of gods while others deny that he exists completely? On this program the hosts will continue their discussion of religious pluralism and contrast the classical Trinitarian view of God as presented in Scripture with other religious viewpoints.

PROGRAM AUDIO


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Michael Horton recently sat down and answered a few questions about Scripture: it's reliability, interpretation, and application to our lives. We’ll be posting videos of his explanations through the end of the year. For more information on our Recovering Scripture campaign and for additional resources to help you “know and share what you believe and why you believe it,” please visit the homepage of our year end appeal.

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I recently gave a talk where I walked through the arguments for the sufficiency of Scripture. It was amazing to me how few of the people—in a conservative evangelical church—had never heard anything on the subject. This is a problem.

Roman Catholic apologists argue forcefully that the Bible is “the Church’s book.” Since the New Testament canon (as well as the Old) was “determined” by the church, it must be the case that the church is the mother of Scripture.

The Reformation countered that the church is the “creature of the Word” (creatura verbi). They knew, of course, that the church preceded the completed canon. After all, the church has existed from Adam and Eve (Gen 3:15) to the present. It is the Word that creates the church, regardless of time and place. Abraham knew less clearly what we know more fully, but the object of his faith was the same: his heir, Jesus Christ, in whom all the families of the earth would be blessed.

But now we have a canon. There is a qualitative difference between the ministry of the apostles and that of the ordinary pastors. Paul could appeal to the immediate revelation of Jesus Christ (Gal 1), while encouraging Timothy to take courage in the gift that was given to him “when the council of elders [presbytery] laid their hands” on him (1 Tim 4:14).

“Scripture alone” does not mean that the church has no authority. Rather, as the Reformers taught, there is a distinction between the extraordinary ministry of prophets and apostles (providing the canonical foundation of the faith) and the ordinary ministry of those pastor-teachers and elders today who lead Christ’s body. The church has a ministerial authority. That’s why we embrace the ecumenical creeds and Reformation confessions (Lutheran or Reformed) as faithful summaries of Scripture. However, the church’s authority is not magisterial. The church may get it wrong, but God’s Word remains. Scripture must have the last word in every controversy.

There is no “apostolic office,” whether of popes or Pentecostal prophets. Christ speaks to us every time we hear the Word of God preached (Rom 10:1-17) on the basis of the biblical canon that is now complete. Even in the days of the apostles, sectarian rivalry threatened the unity of the church. Therefore, Paul declared, “Do not go beyond what is written” (1 Cor 4:6). If churches that were founded by the apostles were in danger of having their candlestick removed (Gal 3:1; 5:4; Rev 2:5), then what hubris is represented by popes who preached a gospel other than the one that was delivered by Christ through his apostles?

Lose the Scriptures and you lose the gospel.

But in our day, it’s Protestants—even evangelicals—who downplay the sufficiency of Scripture for doctrine and life. As in the medieval church, many today think that Scripture is unclear about various doctrines, practices, and forms of worship. It’s just not interesting enough. We have to add our speculations, experiences, and cultural perspectives.

We believe the Reformation recovered the central themes of Scripture that the church slowly had abandoned – as it tends to do in every generation. We all need to recover Scripture: in our devotional lives, as the source of our theology, in our churches, and as the living voice of God today. It is only “by Scripture alone” that we hear the odd announcement of a Father who “so loved the world who gave his only-begotten Son.” Compromise this “sola” and you end up surrendering “solo Christo” (by Christ alone), “sola fide” (through faith alone), and “soli Deo gloria” (to God alone be the glory).

I don’t say this often, because I think it’s often over-used. But with sola scriptura, everything is at stake. That’s why we’re offering a special MP3 CD entitled, "Recovering Scripture," as our gift to you with your $100 donation to White Horse Inn before the end of the year. Let us recover Scripture together: in our devotional lives, as the source of our theology, in our churches, and as the living voice of God today. Click here to take advantage of this special offer and thank you for your support of White Horse Inn.

 
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Posted by on in 2014 Show Archive

What are the major differences between Christianity, Hinduism, and Islam, and how can we reach out to people with Hindu or Muslim backgrounds? On this live edition of White Horse Inn, Michael Horton will discuss these important issues with Hicham Chehab of Salaam Christian Fellowship and Isaac Shaw of Delhi Bible Institute.

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Join the editors of Modern Reformation for a special "meet and greet" reception at the Evangelical Theological Society on Friday, November 21st at 4:30 pm at Trellis Garden Grille on the property of the Town and Country Resort in San Diego, California.

We're especially interested in finding new authors, so if you're in town for the Evangelical Theological Society meeting, please stop by for a bit to eat and get to know Modern Reformation magazine. We'll be previewing our 2015 editorial calendar and talking about the different departments that the magazine will feature.

Although the event is "invitation only," it's very easy to get an invitation: just ask! Our editors will be at the ETS meetings and you can get an invitation from one of us. You can also pick up an invitation from the 1517 Project booth in the exhibit hall. Email us (editor@modernreformation.org) or direct message us on Twitter (@ModRef) to get more information.

The reception begins at 4:30, immediately after the special session in the Golden Ballroom featuring D. A. Carson, Mark Dever, and Michael Horton. Make your way to Trellis Garden Grille for appetizers and drinks before dinner or your trip home.

We're looking forward to meeting you!
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What are the beliefs and assumptions of contemporary American spirituality? Why is it that so many people pick and choose their religious beliefs based on what makes them happy—rather than by evaluating their truth claims? On this edition of White Horse Inn recorded before a live audience in Vail, Colorado, the hosts, along with special guest Greg Koukl, discuss these questions and more as they outline the characteristics of the American Religion.
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Our friend and colleague, Kim Riddlebarger, has announced the forthcoming publication of his new book on B. B. Warfield, The Lion of Princeton: B. B. Warfield as Apologist and Theologian.

The book will appear in both print and as a Logos download in January. You can preorder the Logos version now.

Here's an overview:
There’s little doubt about the impact B.B. Warfield has had on American Christianity. Some hail him for his apologetic and polemical skills, praising him as a defender of Reformed orthodoxy. Others view him with less regard—as too focused on the role of reason in faith and too devoted to the inerrancy of Scripture. But all agree that he is a man with whom one must reckon.

Despite the resurging interest in his life and work, Warfield’s views are often misunderstood. In The Lion of Princeton, Kim Riddlebarger investigates Warfield’s theological, apologetical, and polemical writings, bringing clarity to the confusion that surrounds this key figure of the Princeton tradition.

Riddlebarger provides a biographical overview of Warfield’s life and traces the growing appreciation for Warfield’s thought by contemporary Reformed thinkers. Furthermore, he evaluates the fundamental structures in Warfield’s overall theology and examines Warfield’s work in the field of systematic theology.

Warfield’s theological heirs revere his memory, while his critics continue to find his work misguided and his legacy troubling. “The Lion of Princeton,” as he was known, was certainly up for the challenge. We must therefore take a fresh look at the work of this great scholar, who was in many ways the most significant American apologist, polemicist, and theologian of his age.

Studies in Historical and Systematic Theology is a peer-reviewed series of contemporary monographs exploring key figures, themes, and issues in historical and systematic theology from an evangelical perspective.

In the Logos edition, this valuable volume is enhanced by amazing functionality. Scripture citations link directly to English translations, and important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Michael Horton commends the volume:
It has been a pleasure for me to learn more about Warfield as a colleague of Kim Riddlebarger. To my mind, Kim is a lot like Warfield: lucid and learned, measured and careful with his judgments, yet bold just where it’s needed. This book exposes us to Warfield on his own terms, and usually in his own words.

Congrats, Kim!
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Posted by on in 2014 Show Archive
Is it true that all religious paths lead to the same God? Can something be true
for you, but not for others? How are we to deal with the exclusive claims of
Jesus in our pluralistic age? On this special edition of White Horse
Inn
, our friend Greg Koukl will discuss these questions in his address at a
recent WHI conference.
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